Big Ideas for Small Businesses

So the first thing I need to do here is come clean because I am a massive nerd. I love a good business book and I’ve read a good few. My book shelves are littered with frogs to eat, purple cows and moving cheese and my Audible account looks like an MBA lecturer’s wet dream. I have amassed a multitude of other regurgitateable business speak; but I don’t care. I am fully aware of the stigma that some of these texts carry and they are the root cause of cringeworthy conversations in board rooms across the world as big wigs play buzz word tennis as they seek to understand.

If you’re already in business you’ll know that everyone has an opinion. Everyone will believe they’ve got that silver bullet that you’ve missed in your business. Everyone will have something to say. So you need to be really cautious about who’s counsel you take and a lot of very successful business people will tell you that collecting advice is a road to indecision which can be true. However, I believe that knowledge is power and it’s that pursuit that keeps our ideas fresh and relevant. So, with that pursuit in mind, here’s my review of John Lamerton’s Big Ideas for Small Businesses.

northernmunkeebites.bigideasforsmallbusinessesBig Ideas for Small Businesses: John Lamerton

Rating: 9/10

Key Themes:

  • Ambitious Lifestyle Business
  • F*ck Fear
  • HIIT

Synopsis:

This isn’t about stealing John’s thunder…because you should just get the book…but let me give you my humble opinion on why you should get the book.

Can I be honest? I was sceptical. I’ve read my fair share of books claiming to herald ‘advice’ for small businesses and, more often than not, they fall well short of the mark. However this book really delivered. It is full of simple, succinct and actionable advice and it’s not told from a pedestal. John Lamerton’s book combines a biographical narrative with sufficient breathing room for business advice relayed in a no nonsense fashion. This approach forges a bond between mentor and mentee that creates a sense of togetherness which is not apparent in other business literature I’ve read.

I chose to read the book as a linear narrative (starting at page 1 and working through to 236) however it’s structured in a fashion that allows the reader to dip in and out as appropriate. This book represents the opportunity to do the smart thing and learn from someone else’s mistakes and reap the benefits of insight from someone who has been there, done that and probably made profit from selling the t-shirts.

Verdict: in a word – inspiring! I read this book in one evening. I genuinely couldn’t put down. Now I’m not going to say this book will definitely revolutionise the way you conduct your business but what it will do is provide a tried and tested framework that you can implement today.

Northern Munkee.